DNS hijacking takes advantage of how the Domain Name System functions as the internet’s phone book—or more accurately, a series of phone books that a browser checks, with each book telling a browser which book to look in next, until the final one reveals the location of the server that hosts the website that the user wants to visit. When you type a domain name like “google.com” into your browser, DNS servers hosted by third parties, like the site’s domain registrar, translate it into the IP address for a server that hosts that website.

A DNS lookup is a convoluted process, and one that’s largely out of the destination website’s control. To perform that domain-to-IP translation, a your browser asks a DNS server—hosted by the your internet service provider—for the location of the domain, which then asks a DNS server hosted by the site’s top-level domain registry (the organizations in charge of swathes of the web like .com or .org) and domain registrar, which in turn asks the DNS server of the website or company itself. A hacker who’s able to corrupt a DNS lookup anywhere in that chain can send the visitor off in the wrong direction, making the site appear to be offline, or even redirecting users to a website the attacker controls.

What Is DNS Hijacking?

Keeping your internet property safe from hackers is hard enough on its own. But as WikiLeaks was reminded this week, one hacker technique can take over your entire website without even touching it directly. Instead, it takes advantage of the plumbing of the internet to siphon away your website’s visitors, and even other data like incoming emails, before they ever reach your network.